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2 edition of On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart found in the catalog.

On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart

J. Bell Pettigrew

On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart

with physiological remarks

by J. Bell Pettigrew

  • 299 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Printed by Taylor and Francis in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Muscle.,
  • Heart.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby James Bell Pettigrew.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp.445-500, [5] leaves of plates :
    Number of Pages500
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21005435M

    Arrangement Of Muscle Fibres. circular, muscular coats after they leave the lungs. The fibres of the auricles are not directly continuous with those of the ventricles, the auricular and ventricular fibres being only related to each other by their points of origin, viz., the auriculo-ventricular fibrous zones. In periodically compressed tubular vessels simulating the early embryonic heart tube, a looped tube configuration generated higher maximum pressure heads and higher average flow rates than a straight tube. 39 This suggested that the ventricular loop might add to the efficiency of blood transport early in development in the embryonic vertebrate.

      Cardiac Muscle Definition. Cardiac muscle, also known as heart muscle, is the layer of muscle tissue which lies between the endocardium and inner and outer layers of the heart, respectively, surround the cardiac muscle tissue and separate it from the blood and other organs. Cardiac muscle is made from sheets of cardiac muscle cells. On the arrangemet of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart, with physiological remarks significance of endothelium and sympathetic nerve/medial smooth muscle in the vertebrate vascular system. Laminar structure of the heart: ventricular myocite arrangement and connective tissue architecture in the dog.

      Structure of the Heart.—The arrangement of the muscular fibres of the heart is very complicated and only imperfectly known. For details one of the larger manuals, such as Cunningham’s Anatomy (London, ), or Gray’s Anatomy (London, ), should be consulted. The general scheme is that there are superficial fibres common to the two. The four-chambered mammalian heart is a muscular organ located in the thorax and covered by a tough, fibrous sac, the pericardium. Blood returning from the lungs flows through the pulmonary veins and collects in the left atrium, passes into the left ventricle, and is .


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On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart by J. Bell Pettigrew Download PDF EPUB FB2

"On the Arrangement of the Muscular Fibres in the Ventricles of the Vertebrate Heart, with Physiological Remarks" is an article from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Volume View more articles from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.

View this article on JSTOR. View this article's JSTOR metadata. XIV. On the Arrangement of the Miuscular Fibres in the Ventricles of the Vertebrate Heart, with Physiological Remarks.

By JAMES BELL PETTIGREW, M.D. Edin.; Assistant in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England; Extraordinary Member and late President of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh, &c. On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart, You have access Article.

XIV. On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart, with physiological remarks. James Bell Pettigrew. Google Scholar. Find this author on PubMed.

Search for more papers by this author. James. On the Arrangement of the Muscular Fibres in the Ventricles of the Vertebrate Heart, with Physiological Remarks. Pettigrew, J Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (). – A. STANLEY KENT. the muscular fibres of the heart than any other, states emphatically that the auricles are anatomically distinict from the ventricles, and he states in proof of this, that in boiled hearts the auricles and ventricles may be separated from each other without rupturing a single fibre'.

The proof appears to me to be far from conclusive, for in addition to the difficulty of Cited by: Basically, the single ventricle in the 3-chambered heart is split into 2 chambers in the 4 chambered heart, making 2 ventricles instead of one.

A "double circulation" heart could work with 3 chambers--and it does in reptiles and amphibians. The human heart has 2 atrium-ventricle pairs, which beat in succession something like pistons in a car.

Note the elliptical arrangement of the network and offshoots from the edges that penetrate the myocardium (arrows). f: dissection of the ventricular muscular fibers of an adult human heart. Note the difference in arrangement between the medial and deep layers of the left ventricle.

ventricles of the vertebrate heart, with physiological remarks. Phil. Trans. Royal. On the Arrangement of the Muscular Fibres in the Ventricles of the Vertebrate Heart, with Physiological.

The basic vertebrate cardiovascular system includes a heart that contracts to propel blood out to the body through arteries, and a series of blood vessels. The blood enters the heart through the upper chamber(s), the atrium (or atria).

Passing through a valve, blood enters the lower chamber(s), the ventricle. - Blood enters the heart through two large veins, the inferior and superior vena cava, emptying oxygen-poor blood from the body into the right atrium of the heart - As the atrium contracts, blood flows from your right atrium into your right ventricle through the open tricuspid valve - When the ventricle is full, the tricuspid valve shuts.

The vertebrate heart is formed via the folding of the lateral cardiogenic mesodermal layer of the embryonic disk to create the tubular heart. The heart section of the tube then loops around and produces a protruding ventricle and atrium, leaving the remaining inner tubular system with its original tubular appearance (Jensen et al.

The arrangement of the ventricular myocardial fibers of the ostrich heart (Struthio camelus) was macro and mesoscopically studied in 14 ostrich hearts, dissected by an adaptation of the Pettigrew.

At the end of the winter session Professor Goodsir gave out as the subject of his senior anatomy gold medal for session[quot]The Arrangement of the Muscular Fibres in the Ventricles of the Vertebrate Heart.[quot] This formed the veritable Gordian knot of anatomy and had been a subject of dispute for some years.

On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate, with physiological remarks. Philosophical Transactions,– CrossRef Google Scholar. On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart, with physiological remarks. Philos Trans R Soc Lond.

;– CrossRef Google Scholar. It may be MUSCULAR FIBRES OF THE HEART. easily stripped off, and is thin and semi-transparent, thicker in the left than in the right cavities, thickest of all in the left auricle. Arrangement of the Muscular Fibres of the AuriclesThe fibres of the auricles are distinct from those of the : Books Group.

Structure of Heart 2. Pathology of Heart 3. Innervation. Structure of Heart: The heart of fishes is known as branchial heart, because its main function is to pump venous blood to ventral aorta into gills (branchial) and then to somatic vasculature. Thus branchial and systemic vascular beds are arranged in series with heart.

The ventricle is undivided, but venous and arterial blood remain mostly separate by the arrangement of vessels leaving the heart.

Separation of the ventricles is nearly complete in some reptiles (crocodilians) and is completely separate in birds and mammals (Figure ). The left side of the heart received oxygenated blood (often colored red in diagrams) from the lungs and pumps it to the aorta, so it may be distributed throughout the body.

The heart consists of four chambers: The left side and the right side each have one atrium and one ventricle. Each of the upper chambers, the right atrium (plural = atria. The ventricle of the fish heart is a chamber that exhibits great morphological and vascular variability among species.

However, although the Neotropical region has the greatest taxonomic and functional diversity in freshwater fish, many considerations have been formed without previous knowledge of the ventricular morphology of these fishes. Thus, the purpose of the present study was. Chris L. Wells, in Geriatric Rehabilitation Manual (Second Edition), VENTRICULAR RECONSTRUCTION.

When the ventricle becomes dilated as a consequence of ischemic heart disease or develops an aneurysm as a result of a large transmural myocardial infarction, the ventricle is unable to generate a sufficient contraction to maintain cardiac output and the patient develops heart failure.muscle fibres are characterized by their large size (i.e.

breadth); they have the same general histological characters in all parts of the heart. Measurements are given for the fibres from various parts of the hearts of the salamander and frog.

The muscular connexions between the various cardiac chambers have been studied in detail.Kocica M.J., Corno A.F., Corno, et al. The helical ventricular myocardial band: global, three-dimensional, functional architecture of the ventricular myocardium.

European J Car-Thor Sur ;ss 5. Pettigrew J.B. On the arrangement of the muscular fibres in the ventricles of the vertebrate heart, with physiological remarks.